512 GB Phones are here. How much storage do you actually need?

Huawei’s new phone is coming with 512GB of built in storage. This is two times more than the iPhone X’s largest option. Don’t get your wallet out just yet; we won’t know how well the memory performs until the phone is released and it is priced at over $1000. Bigger is always marketed as better but do you actually need 512 GB of storage on your phone? That is half a terabyte!!

With cloud storage and streaming services becoming exceedingly popular, storing video, music, and photos directly on your phone may not be necessary. But there are definitely some benefits to storing data on your phone. As we have seen with the private celebrity photos leaked from iCloud, cloud storage is not secure enough to be trusted. Downloading data can be a pain as well. Mobile data plans can be expensive and if you don’t have service you can’t access your data. For me, larger phone storage is a great alternative to the cloud.

If you are shooting a ton of high resolution photos or 4K video, then storage is incredibly important. The Huawei’s new P20 Pro comes with four cameras. Three on the back and one selfie cam. With a 40 megapixel main camera, it surely packs a punch. The other additional cameras are used for depth perception to help with focusing and zooming. Interestingly enough, it doesn’t come with a headphone jack which may be a deal breaker for some. Overall, the P20 Pro is a unique phone on the cutting edge of innovation.

Uber's self-driving trucks are coming to highways near you

In 2016, Uber made its very first delivery with a self-driving truck. Today, less than two years after Uber’s self-driving trucks made their first delivery, Uber announced that their self-driving trucks have been successfully moving freight on a large scale.

Drivers have been present in the trucks, ready to take control in the event of an emergency, but Uber has been working to take them away. Uber has been lobbying for regulators to allow their trucks to operate without human supervision.

More importantly, Uber is limited to operating commercially in Arizona; but the company has its sights set on expanding to other states and is seeking for approval. Uber plans to expand its network of self-driving trucks to nearby states and eventually the entire continental United States. It won’t be long until you notice yourself passing one on the highway.

If you are interesting in how they work, we have you covered. A regular truck driven by a person picks up a load from a shipper and drops it off at a local transfer hub. (Think of transfer hubs as large parking lots for trucks.) A self-driving truck takes the load and hauls it to a different transfer hub closer to its destination. This is the longest part of the journey and can be safely done by a self-driving truck since it is almost entirely highway driving. The self-driving truck doesn’t have to do any complicated maneuvers and can drive predefined routes that it knows. Once at a transfer hub close to its destination, the load is picked up by a regular truck and delivered.

This system is great for truck drivers. Currently, OTR truck drivers have to stay away from home almost all the time. They often are on the road for weeks at a time. With Uber’s approach, drivers can haul freight locally during the day and return to their beds at night. This effectively turns trucking into a nine-to-five job.

17 Phone Security Tips

At least one hundred million Americans use smartphones such as an iPhone or an Android, which suddenly stopped working, for some reasons. According to Consumer Reports, many smartphones users do not secure their phones. The user can take precautions to secure their phones, such as:

Update Alerts
These alerts are there for a reason, new information and security patches. Most people ignore warnings or wait long to activate them. You should always know the nature of the alerts, and the experienced user does not have automatic activation.

Remote Wipe
This security procedure should be built into your phone., such as setting up your iPhone’s iCloud or your Android device’s Google Sync. Your data can be remotely wiped if you lose your device. Further, your device should be set to wipe automatically after repeated password attempts. With a use of this security technique, this stops your device from being used maliciously.

Passcode
Do not use your birthdate or any other personal information. The best passcode lock is your finger print for it is always possible for someone to sneak a peek at you password.

Encrypting Storage
Your device, most likely, will be able to encrypt the phone storage. Some devices encrypt by default without your knowledge, using built-in encryptions. Encryption protects such things as photos, e-mails, and your social networking accounts.

Download Offers
For security purpose, do not click on download offers which may hide and activate viruses.

Apps
Do not buy Apps from third-party sources. App stores are very security minded, such as AppStore for iOS devices or Google Play for Android, and can be trusted.

Anti-virus Software
Even though using this software protects against malware, and has been popularized, people still ignore this essential security protection.

Public Wi-Fi
There are no security patches for public Wi-Fi, and you take a significant risk turning on your computer at your favorite restaurant or coffee house. Further, you should delete WI-Fi networks from all your devices that are not your home or business WI-Fi networks.

Virtual Private Network (VPN)
There are VPN services like IPVanish, CyberGhost VPN, GhostPath, and Hotspot Shield VPN. Also, the website privateinternetaccess.com has the same function as VPNs. Using VPNs will permit you access to the Internet without a real concern of breaching the security of your device.VPNs successfully encrypts cyberspace activity, by employing a scrambling technique. This scrambling makes it difficult for hackers to steal data.

WiFi and Bluetooth
Both should be turned off when they are not being used. Reducing your potential surface of attack can help keep you safe.

Secure Your IMEI or MEID Numbers
Do not give out your IMEI or MEID numbers. It has been shown that giving out these numbers to anyone that say they are representatives of telecommunications companies could lead to email scams from hackers. IMEI and MEID numbers are identifiers for your device which are device unique.

Reset
You should factory reset and clear your data before the device is sold or recycled. That way, an attack is unable to steal any data from your device.

Auto-Lock
If your device has the auto-lock feature, you should use. This feature prevents the device from staying open to be accessed by others.

No Sharing
Your device is yours with your password and private data. Don’t tell your friends you passcode. You wouldn’t want to give them access to your bank account.

Delete Text Messages
This method is universally neglected. It is not uncommon that a text message may have a social security number or other personal data.

Backup
To secure your data back it up. Backing up is the best security technique if your phone is lost or stolen. Backing up data is often free with new smart phones.

No Jailbreaking
Jailbreaking removes software restrictions and permits access (root) imposed by software manufacturers such as Apple. Jailbreaking allows downloading and installing applications or extensions not available through the app stores, which will result in weakening of your device’s security.

Everything There Is To Know About IRS Phone Scams

Have you ever received a threatening call from the “IRS” demanding that you immediately pay your taxes? Or maybe you received a voicemail from the “IRS” where they told you to call you back at a specific number? Sadly, you probably have. IRS phone scams are becoming more common every day. This guide will show you how to stay safe and prevent scammers from taking advantage of you.

If you do receive a phone call from someone claiming to be from the IRS, the safest thing is to hang-up, and then contact the IRS yourself. Do not trust your caller ID. Just because the number displayed on caller ID is the official IRS phone number doesn’t mean that you are speaking to the IRS. Scammers can spoof their number and make it appear that they are calling from any number (even a government number like the IRS’s phone number). It is always your best option to hang up and call back using an official IRS phone number.

The IRS commonly does contact people via phone, but they will not contact you for anything except to ask to schedule an appointment via phone or at an IRS office. Here is a list of the things that scammers do but the IRS will never do.

  • Aggressively harass you over the phone while demanding immediate payment
  • Tell you that you cannot contact a tax attorney or visit an IRS office before payment
  • Threaten to have the police arrest you and your family
  • Ask for credit card or bank details over the phone unless you have stated that you want to provide them as a means of payment
  • Accept payment via gift cards, bank wire transfers, PayPal, Western Union, or any other online payment provider. The IRS does accept payment via direct debit from a bank account, paycheck deduction, debit card, credit card, and check. This list may not be entirely up to date. Please check the IRS website for more information.
IRS Phone Numbers

800-829-1040 - Individual and joint tax filers
800-829-4933 - Businesses
800-829-3676 - Tax form assistance
800-829-1954 - Tax refunds
877-777-4778 - Help line
866-699-4083 - Estate tax and gifts
800-829-4059 - Hearing impairment assistance
888-912-1227 - Give suggestions on improving the IRS

Find local IRS offices

Phone Saftey 101

Have you ever been called by someone claiming they are from the IRS? Or maybe you have dealt with people claiming they are from Microsoft and your computer has a virus? Either way, nuisance phone calls are becoming a large problem for everyday people. It can be hard to deal with scammers that keep calling even when you tell them to stop. This article will give you tips on how to handle situations with unwanted callers.

What do you do if you receive a suspicious phone call from someone claiming to be an IRS, Microsoft, or FBI employee?

  1. Ask for the employee’s information. Write down their name, department, callback number, and any other information that they offer. This will be vital to determining if they are a legitimate employee.
  2. Look up how to contact the business or agency the employee claims they are from. An easy way is to use a search engine to find an official website. Do NOT go to any website that the person on the phone gives you. They may be lying and telling you a fake website.
  3. Contact the actual business or agency and have them verify the authenticity of the employee’s information that you wrote down. If they are unable to verify the information, then the person that called you was likely a scammer. Do not call them back unless you are sure that they are an actual employee.
  4. Report the scammer. Informing other people of a phone scammer can help prevent them from successfully pulling off future attacks. Head over to Glasscaller.com, search for the scammer’s phone number, and leave a detailed comment of your experience.

What should you do if you receive a suspicious text message?

  1. Don’t reply. Replying lets the person on the other end know that they have successfully contacted someone.
  2. Don’t download any pictures or attachments that they send you. Attachments can infect your phone with a malware.
  3. Don’t click any links. Even if you recognize the link that they send you, don’t click it. Attackers commonly use links that look like legitimate but redirect you to a malicious website.
  4. Report your experience. It is important to spread the word about suspicious attacks. Navigate to Glasscaller.com, search the phone number that you received a suspicious text message from, and write a comment about what happened. You can also view what other people have said about their experiences with that phone number.

Now you know the best way to handle nuisance calls and suspicious text messages. We hope that you put this information to good use and stay safe when using your phone.

Who Called Me?

It can be frustrating not knowing who left you that mysterious voicemail. Or maybe you just want to know who’s calling you at this very moment. Either way, you really just want to know more information about a telephone number, right? We have you covered.

Back in the days before the internet, the only way to know who was behind a telephone number was to search through a phone book or ask the person and hope they are telling you the truth. Luckily for you, the internet entirely solves this problem. No longer will you have to deal with the complexities of verifying who a phone number belongs to. Now all you have to do is type in the number and press search. Looking up a phone number couldn’t be any easier.

But is a name and address really what you want? A name doesn’t tell you what the caller’s true motives are. Maybe they are pretending to be someone they are not. It doesn’t take much to fall into a complex trap and give away some information that you shouldn’t. That is why phone number reputation services are much more useful than the standard reverse phone lookup. They tell you more than just who is calling you. They tell you want a caller has done in the past and if you should spend time speaking to a caller. They tell you what you actually want to know before you press accept. And most importantly, they help keep you safe from scams and fraud.

Telephone scams are becoming a greater threat to companies and individuals around the world. Scammers are using techniques such as “social engineering” to trick uneducated people into giving away information and money when they shouldn’t be. To prevent such a thing from occurring, always lookup the reputation of a phone number before answering. This will ensure that you are aware of any potential scams that other people have reported. If you do encounter a scam, make sure to share your experience so that others can learn from it.

Have a phone number that you want to know more about? Or maybe you are thinking “who called me?” Search it above to reveal all the information that there is to know about it. Completely free as well.

Uber caves to users' demands to add tipping

As part of its “180 Days of Change,” Uber finally says it will be adding tipping directly to the app. This feature has been requested by drivers and passengers for many years now. However, not all users are happy about this new feature. Many enjoy the relaxed nature of Uber rides where the driver isn’t attempting to build a relationship with the passengers in hopes of a tip. Whether or not this new feature will change the customers experience is up to debate.

Uber plans on incrementally releasing the new feature to cities across the US. Right now, tipping is available in Seattle, Minneapolis, and Houston. In less than a month, Uber plans to “make tips available to all U.S. drivers.” Feel free to read more about what else Uber has planned. https://pages.et.uber.com/180-days/

I, for one, welcome the new changes Uber is bringing. It is great to see that the tech startup is listening to its users and attempting to fix problems and improve its service.

If A Phone Call From A Stranger Seems Too Good To Be True, It Probably Is

Imagine this - you’re in your car, coming home after a long day at work. You’re tired, hungry, and you just want a chance to relax. Then, your cell phone rings. The Caller ID is a phone number you’ve never seen before, but you answer it anyway. It could be important, you think.

And at first, it seems like it is. The person on the other end of the phone has some amazing news for you. You’ve won the grand prize! They have a five million dollar check with your name on it at their office! All they need is to confirm your address and bank information and they’ll deposit it first thing in the morning!

After you get off the phone, you’re still feeling elated. You’ll be able to quit your job, and go do the traveling you’ve always wanted to do! You can pay off your mortgage and your car loan! But the longer you sit there, the more doubt begins to creep in. On second thought, you don’t actually remember ever entering this contest. And don’t they normally just show up at your door with a big check? You’ve never heard of them depositing it before.

By the next morning, doubt has turned into dread. Because there isn’t five million dollars in your bank account - there’s nothing. The stranger you gave your information to has taken everything.

Hopefully nothing this extreme has ever really happened to you, but this scenario plays out time and time again all over the world, every day. Even as you read this article, thousands of scammers are making phone calls to try and swindle hard working, honest people out of their money. And this is just one of the many deplorable methods they use. Automated menus that prompt you to press certain numbers that will secretly give them access to your information, getting you to answer “yes” to questions in order to have your authorization recorded for the future, and attempting to sell you extravagant items for low, low prices when the purchase will never actually be delivered are a few of their other favorite ploys.

How can you protect yourself? Never answer a phone call if you don’t know who’s calling you. Never believe anything a stranger on the phone tells you, and don’t engage with them. As soon as they start asking for personal information, hang up.

You can also help to protect others by using Glasscaller, a service that allows you to enter a phone number and leave a comment. And you can read the comments left by others. Have a missed call from a phone number you don’t know? Look it up on Glasscaller before calling back, and you might save yourself the hassle of talking to a swindler on the other end.

With Glasscaller’s help, you can fight back against these con artists.

Amp and Adwords

Tutorial: How to get Google Adwords tracking to work with Google AMP.

Don’t get me wrong, AMP is great. It’s just that it is new and the documentation is lacking. A couple sentences and no code is not enough to be able to figure out what to do without looking through the source code. Lucky for you, I dug through the source code and figured out how to actually use Google Adwords with AMP.

Just add this HTML to your AMP page and replace the required values. Please note, not all of the variables are required so you can remove the ones you don’t need.

Conversion tracking

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<amp-analytics type="googleadwords">
<script type="application/json">
{
"vars": {
"googleConversionId": "TODO",
"googleConversionLabel": "TODO",

"googleConversionColor": "TODO",
"googleConversionLanguage": "TODO",
"googleConversionCurrency": "TODO",
"googleConversionValue": "TODO"
},
"triggers": {
"trackPageview": {
"on": "visible",
"request": "conversion"
}
}
}
</script>
</amp-analytics>

Remarketing tracking

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 <amp-analytics type="googleadwords">
<script type="application/json">
{
"vars": {
"googleConversionId": "TODO",
"googleConversionLabel": "TODO"
},
"triggers": {
"trackPageview": {
"on": "visible",
"request": "remarketing"
}
}
}
</script>
</amp-analytics>

https://developers.google.com/adwords/amp/landing-pages#conversion_tracking_and_remarketing
https://github.com/ampproject/amphtml/pull/7273/files#diff-43075fef96144a4f898edb8d18aae69a

What's Glasscaller?

Welcome to Glasscaller! We are excited to be inviting you to try out our awesome new website. Since you probably aren’t familiar with us, we are a reverse phone number search platform. We allow users to share their thoughts about calls that they receive.

We are committed to brining you the best possible service that we can. Below are our some core principles that we stand for and features that we offer.

Privacy

We know you value your privacy which is why privacy is our number one concern. You might not want the person who called you to know that you searched for their number. Or maybe they didn’t call you but instead you just forgot their name. Don’t worry, we have your back. Unlike other reverse phone number search websites, we don’t keep track of what people search for. We have no information to provide if someone comes knocking. That’s because we don’t keep logs. We also will never under any circumstance notify someone that their number has been searched. This would completely violate the trust of all of our users.

Results

You might be thinking, “Why would I use glasscaller over X?” Just because website X says they have billions of rows of data doesn’t mean that they have what you are looking for. Glasscaller offers more than every phone book combined. It offers recent feedback and information from actual people. Knowing a phone call you missed was from a scammer will save you valuable time and energy. Unlike other websites, our servers don’t sit around gathering dust. Our service constantly analyzes a colossal amount of new information that is available on phone numbers every single day.

Free

We won’t make you give us your credit card to look up phone numbers. It would completely breach our core principles. If we collected money from our users, we would have to keep track of what they were searching for. This would violate our number one priority which is privacy. Looking up phone numbers is completely free and will remain free for forever.

Unlimited

Perhaps you have a long list of numbers that you want more information about. We won’t stop you half way and ask you to create an account, verify your phone number, or send us some money. We don’t limit how many searches you can perform unless you are impacting our ability to serve other users.

Stop spam

Don’t get stuck dealing with scammers. Our community driven feedback system will keep you alert of potential scams and unwanted phone calls. If you receive a call from an unfamiliar number, don’t immediately answer it. Search for the number on glasscaller and see what other users have said about it.